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Serengeti-Park animals: Gibbon
Wildlife in Serengeti-Park

White-handed Gibbon | Hylobates Lar

The white-han­ded gib­bon or Lar is a pri­mate spe­cies of the gib­bon family. They are curr­ently clas­si­fied as end­an­ge­red with popu­la­tion dec­rea­sing! They are parti­cu­larly fast and maneu­vera­ble and can jump up to 14 meters high in the air! Gib­bons are very alert, easily exci­ta­ble ani­mals whose keen eyes and ears do not miss any­t­hing that hap­pens around them, even when they seem to be asleep! They live in small groups and hold a strong family bond.

Serengeti-Park animals: White-shouldered Capuchin
Wildlife in Serengeti-Park

White-shouldered Capuchin | Cebus capucinus

The cute and voci­fe­rous white-shoul­de­red capu­ch­ins live in the tro­pi­cal forests of Cen­tral Ame­rica at altitu­des of up to 2000 meters. They also feel very com­for­ta­ble in our cli­mate. Wit­hin a group there is a clear ran­king among the adult fema­les and among the males.

Serengeti-Park animals: Wildebeest
Wildlife in Serengeti-Park

Wildebeest | Connochaetes taurinus

Wil­de­beest belong to the genus of Afri­can ante­lopes. They live toge­ther in large herds and with other ante­lope spe­cies and zebras. There are two types of wil­de­beest: the white-tai­led gnu (living in South Africa) and the blue wil­de­beest (South and East Africa). In the park you will dis­co­ver the blue wil­de­beest. These wil­de­beests reach a height of 150 centi­me­ters with 180 to 250 kilo­grams of weight. They love fresh grass and can safely find the areas where it has been rai­ning.

Serengeti-Park animals: Zwergzebu
Wildlife in Serengeti-Park

Zwergzebu | Bos taurus indicus

Zwerg­zebu or domestic cattle are small cattle from the Zebu lineage. They are native to South Asia and are now wide­s­p­read in South Ame­rica. Next to the water buf­falo, they are the main tro­pi­cal live­stock. Due to the low weight and sure-foo­ted­ness of zwerg­zebu, they hardly cause damage to the ground. Thus, they help with field work. For long jour­neys, they are used for trans­port.